Boat owners can fight barnacles with new eco-friendly method

Barnacles can be found in all marine environments and are a major problem for both small boats and large ships. Barnacles accumulate on the hulls and can reduce the fuel economy of a vessel by up to 40 per cent, increasing ...

Oysters at risk from changing climate

Climate change's effect on coastal ecosystems is very likely to increase mortality risks of adult oyster populations in the next 20 years.

Vibrio bacteria found in Norwegian seafood and seawater

(PhysOrg.com) -- While working on her doctorate, Anette Bauer Ellingsen discovered potentially disease-causing vibrios (Vibrio cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus) in Norwegian seafood and inshore seawater.

Oysters disappearing worldwide: study

A survey of oyster habitats around the world has found that the succulent mollusks are disappearing fast and 85 percent of their reefs have been lost due to disease and over-harvesting.

Scientists: Gulf health nearly at pre-spill level

(AP) -- Scientists judge the overall health of the Gulf of Mexico as nearly back to normal one year after the BP oil spill, but with glaring blemishes that restrain their optimism about nature's resiliency, an Associated ...

Oyster Shells Tell Story

(PhysOrg.com) -- Some oysters provide pearls but all oyster shells have a story to tell, if you know how to look for them. One compelling story about North America’s first successful English settlement has unfolded before ...

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Oyster

The word oyster is used as a common name for a number of distinct groups of bivalve molluscs which live in marine or brackish habitats. The valves are highly calcified.

Some kinds of oyster are commonly consumed, cooked or raw, by humans. Other kinds, such as pearl oysters, are not. These are considered an aphrodisiac.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA