Chesapeake Bay oysters get more attention at pivotal time

Robert T. Brown pulled an oyster shell from a pile freshly harvested by a dredger from the Chesapeake Bay and talked enthusiastically about the larvae attached—a sign of a future generation critical to the health of the ...

New York seeks to claw back 'Big Oyster' past

One sunny morning in New York, a dozen biologists and volunteers stand in knee-deep water, chucking net sacks of oyster shells down a human chain, before planting them in containers on the riverbed.

The wisdom of pearl farming

Why exactly do little white nuggets from the sea cost so much? And how have humans hacked the biological process that makes them?

Oysters: one animal, two glues

Oysters build extensive reef communities by cementing to one another early in their lives. Scientists have known they secrete an adhesive for this purpose, but new research shows the glue they make as babies and juveniles ...

Oysters close their shells in response to low-frequency sounds

Oysters rapidly close their shells in response to low-frequency sounds characteristic of marine noise pollution, according to a study published October 25, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Jean-Charles Massabuau ...

'Oyster wranglers' scout rivers for signs of shellfish life

A New Jersey environmental group that has had success re-establishing oyster colonies in struggling waterways is trying a new tactic in two rivers at the Jersey shore: checking the water to see if oysters are already there.

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