Oysters: one animal, two glues

Oysters build extensive reef communities by cementing to one another early in their lives. Scientists have known they secrete an adhesive for this purpose, but new research shows the glue they make as babies and juveniles ...

Oysters close their shells in response to low-frequency sounds

Oysters rapidly close their shells in response to low-frequency sounds characteristic of marine noise pollution, according to a study published October 25, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Jean-Charles Massabuau ...

Chesapeake Bay pollution extends to early 19th century

Humans began measurably and negatively impacting water quality in the Chesapeake Bay in the first half of the 19th century, according to a study of eastern oysters by researchers at The University of Alabama.

Changing Chesapeake Bay acidity impacting oyster shell growth

Acidity is increasing in some regions of the Chesapeake Bay even faster than is occurring in the open ocean, where it is now recognized that increased levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide dissolve in the seawater thereby ...

Oyster Shells Tell Story

(PhysOrg.com) -- Some oysters provide pearls but all oyster shells have a story to tell, if you know how to look for them. One compelling story about North America’s first successful English settlement has unfolded before ...

Chesapeake Bay oysters get more attention at pivotal time

Robert T. Brown pulled an oyster shell from a pile freshly harvested by a dredger from the Chesapeake Bay and talked enthusiastically about the larvae attached—a sign of a future generation critical to the health of the ...

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