'Extinct' orchid discovered hiding in plain sight

Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria, together with a team of scientists, have released a new scientific paper showing that the previously presumed extinct species called Prasophyllum morganii, commonly known as mignonette leek ...

New species of orchids discovered in Sichuan, China

During an investigation of wild orchid resources in Sichuan Province (the second National Key Protected Wild Plant Resources Survey), researchers from the Wuhan Botanical Garden of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, together ...

Orchid reintroduction is helpful to long-term species protection

Orchids are a charismatic group of plant species that currently face a considerable number of threats to their long-term survival. Orchids produce thousands of dust-like seeds that may be easily dispersed by wind. However, ...

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Orchidaceae

The Orchidaceae, commonly referred to as the orchid family, is a morphologically diverse and widespread family of monocots in the order Asparagales. Along with the Asteraceae, it is one of the two largest families of flowering plants, with between 21,950 and 26,049 currently accepted species, found in 880 genera. Selecting which of the two families is larger remains elusive because of the difficulties associated with putting hard species numbers on such enormous groups. Regardless, the number of orchid species equals more than twice the number of bird species, and about four times the number of mammal species. It also encompasses about 6–11% of all seed plants. The largest genera are Bulbophyllum (2,000 species), Epidendrum (1,500 species), Dendrobium (1,400 species) and Pleurothallis (1,000 species).

The family also includes Vanilla (the genus of the vanilla plant), Orchis (type genus), and many commonly cultivated plants such as Phalaenopsis and Cattleya. Moreover, since the introduction of tropical species in the 19th century, horticulturists have produced more than 100,000 hybrids and cultivars.

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