Optical computing at sub-picosecond speeds

Vanderbilt researchers have developed the next generation of ultrafast data transmission that may make it possible to make already high-performance computing "on demand." The technology unjams bottlenecks in data streams ...

Comb of a lifetime: A new method for fluorescence microscopy

Fluorescence microscopy is widely used in biochemistry and life sciences because it allows scientists to directly observe cells and certain compounds in and around them. Fluorescent molecules absorb light within a specific ...

Bacterial nanopores open the future of data storage

In 2020, each person in the world is producing about 1.7 megabytes of data every second. In just a single year, that amounts to 418 zettabytes—or 418 billion one-terabyte hard drives.

Intelligent nanomaterials for photonics

Since the Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded for research on graphene in 2010, 2-D materials—nanosheets with atomic thickness—have been a hot topic in science. This significant interest is due to their outstanding properties, ...

Record-breaking, floating laser resonator

Physical Review X recently reported on a new optical resonator from the Technion—Israel Institute of Technology that is unprecedented in resonance enhancement. Developed by graduate student Jacob Kher-Alden under the supervision ...

Plasma guides maintain focus of lasers

In science fiction, firing powerful lasers looks easy—the Death Star can just send destructive power hurtling through space as a tight beam. But in reality, once a powerful laser has been fired, care must be taken to ensure ...

Trapping tiny particles: A versatile tool for nanomanipulation

At just 1/1000th of a millimeter, nanoparticles are impossible to see with the naked eye. But, despite being small, they're extremely important in many ways. If scientists want to take a close look at DNA, proteins, or viruses, ...

page 1 from 13