Biphilic surfaces reduce defrosting times in heat exchangers

Ice formation and accumulation are challenging concerns for several industrial applications including heating ventilation air conditioning and refrigeration (HVAC&R) systems, aircraft, energy transmission, and transportation ...

Plug-and-play lens simplifies adaptive optics for microscopy

Researchers have developed a new plug-and-play device that can add adaptive optics correction to commercial optical microscopes. Adaptive optics can greatly improve the quality of images acquired deep into biological samples, ...

Matrix imaging: an innovation for improving ultrasound resolution

In conventional ultrasounds, variations in soft tissue structure distort ultrasound wavefronts. They blur the image and can hence prove detrimental to medical diagnosis. Researchers at the Institut Langevin (CNRS/ESPCI Paris-PSL)1 ...

Monitoring glaciers with optical fibers

Seismic monitoring of glaciers is essential to improving our understanding of their development and to predicting risks. SNSF Professor Fabian Walter has come up with a new monitoring tool in the form of optical fibers. The ...

Research team produces new nanosheets for near infrared imaging

Egyptian blue is one of the oldest manmade colour pigments. It adorns, for instance, the crown of the world famous bust of Nefertiti. But the pigment can do even more. An international research team led by Dr. Sebastian Kruss ...

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Optical imaging

Optical imaging is an imaging technique.

Optics usually describes the behavior of visible, ultraviolet, and infrared light used in imaging.

Because light is an electromagnetic wave, similar phenomena occur in X-rays, microwaves, radio waves. Chemical imaging or molecular imaging involves inference from the deflection of light emitted from (e.g. laser, infrared) source to structure, texture,anatomic and chemical properties of material (e.g. cristal, cell tissue). Optical imaging systems may be divided into diffusive and ballistic imaging systems.

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