Mysterious soil virus gene seen for first time

In every handful of soil, there are billions of bacteria, fungi, and viruses, all working to sustain the cycle of life. Understanding how these microorganisms interact with one another helps scientists analyze soil health, ...

Benefits of biosolids spread across decades of research

For more than four decades, biosolids have been applied to land and studied by researchers for many useful purposes. Biosolids are a product of the wastewater treatment process. Yes, that means sewage. However, the sewage ...

Noise affects life on the seafloor

Oceans have their own unique soundscape. Many marine organisms, for example, use sound for echolocation, navigation or communication with conspecifics. In recent decades, however, more and more sounds caused by human activities ...

Did our ancestors have better microbiomes? For maize, maybe!

At today's backyard barbeques, we enjoy corn on the cob with hundreds of sweet juicy kernels. But if we were eating teosinte, the wild ancestor of corn, we would be lucky to enjoy a dozen kernels per ear. In fact, many of ...

Soil microbes return after replanting local native plants

Robust long-term ecosystem restoration relies not just on replanting native vegetation but on the recovery of underlying soil biodiversity—yet this area has received little attention and is poorly understood, Flinders University ...

Worms, nutrient cycling supports Coorong remediation

A new article in Science of The Total Environment led by Flinders University describes how transferring poor sediments to more healthy nearby areas of the Ramsar-listed Coorong shallow lagoon, and returning macrobenthic organisms ...

page 1 from 11