Related topics: brain · brain activity

'Walking' fish help scientists to understand how we left the ocean

Our ancestors' transition out of the water and onto the land was a pivotal moment in evolution. No longer buoyed by water, early tetrapods (animals with four limbs) had to overcome gravity in order to move their bodies. Exactly ...

Same gene, different mating techniques in flies

A study of two related species of fruit fly published in JNeurosci reveals that a gene known to regulate behavior for attracting a mate in one species gives rise to unique wooing techniques observed in the other species.

Study reveals fruit flies exhibit the building blocks of emotion

A fruit fly starts buzzing around food at a picnic, so you wave your hand over the insect and shoo it away. But when the insect flees the scene, is it doing so because it is actually afraid? Using fruit flies to study the ...

From strangers to mates in 15 minutes

Ah, to be a fruit fly. No meddling matchmakers, creepy dates or frog kissing. Females process the sights, smell, sounds and touch of love to choose Mr. Right in 15 minutes. Researchers at Case Western Reserve University discovered ...

Why do we gesticulate?

If you rely on hand gestures to get your point across, you can thank fish for that! Scientists have found that the evolution of the control of speech and hand movements can be traced back to the same place in the brain, which ...

RoboBees get smart in pollen pursuit

(Phys.org) —When a scout honeybee returns to the hive, she performs a "waggle dance," looping and shaking her rear end in particular patterns to direct her comrades toward the jackpot of nectar and pollen she's found. Her ...

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