Team rewires a behavioral circuit in a worm using hydra parts

For two people to communicate in a loud, crowded room, they need to be standing side by side. The same is often true for neurons in the brain. But the same way a cell phone allows two people to communicate clearly across ...

New insights into the formation of faeces

New research from Flinders University has uncovered further details on how the guinea pig gut forms solid fecal pellets, providing potential insights that could help in the management of human bowel issues.

Underlying instincts: An appetite for survival

Microscopic roundworms may hold the key to understanding what is happening in the brain when the instinct of an animal changes in order to survive. In a newly published paper in the journal Current Biology, University of ...

Why male mosquitoes leave humans alone

Male mosquitoes won't bite you. For one thing, they cannot—males are hopelessly bad at finding humans and lack a specialized stylet to pierce your skin. But even if they could bite you, they would not want to. They refuse ...

GridTape: An automated electron microscopy platform

How are networks of neurons connected to make functional circuits? This has been a long standing question in neuroscience. To answer this fundamental question, researchers from Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical ...

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