Nest security camera knows who's home with Google face tech

Nest Labs is adding Google's facial recognition technology to a high-resolution home-security camera, offering a glimpse of a future in which increasingly intelligent, internet-connected computers can see and understand what's ...

Nest of rare ant T. rex found in Singapore

(Phys.org)—A pair of researchers with Singapore Botanic Gardens and the National University of Singapore has found and studied a nest of Tyrannomyrmex rex, a first for the rare species of ant. In their paper published in ...

Anemonefish dads further fathering research

Like the father in "Finding Nemo," anemonefish dads will do almost anything to support their offspring. Their parenting instincts are so strong that if you give a bachelor anemonefish a scoop of anemonefish eggs from an unrelated ...

99-million-year-old termite-loving thieves caught in Burmese amber

Eusocial insects, such as ants, social wasps and bees, and termites, include some of the most ecologically ubiquitous of terrestrial animals. The nests of these insects are well protected and provide a safe, communal space ...

'Nesting doll' minerals offer clues to Earth's mantle dynamics

Recovered minerals that originated in the deep mantle can give scientists a rare glimpse into the dynamic processes occurring deep inside of the Earth and into the history of the planet's mantle layer. A team led by Yingwei ...

Bumblebees' smelly feet help determine where to find lunch

Scientists from the University of Bristol have discovered that bumblebees have the ability to use 'smelly footprints' to make the distinction between their own scent, the scent of a relative and the scent of a stranger.

Is Australia the birthplace of birds nests?

The most common birds nests found today had their birthplace in Australia, and these nests may be key to many of our birds' success, according to new research from Macquarie University, released today.

Male bumblebees leave home without looking back

Male bumblebees leave home and fly away without looking back, making no effort to remember the location of the nest, researchers at the University of Exeter have found.

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