Alien honeybees could cause plant extinction

New research indicates that introduced 'alien' honeybees are competing for resources with native bees and threatening the survival of plants that rely on interactions with specific pollinators.

Planting native vegetation for productive crops

The University of Adelaide, working with South Australian industry groups, is helping farmers and growers design and implement native plantings to support bee and other insect populations needed to pollinate their crops and ...

How are pollinators faring with Anthropogenic change?

Pollinators provide irreplaceable ecosystem services. One out of every three bites of food are attributable to pollination. Pollinators bring us many of our favorite fruits and vegetables (see this list of crops that use ...

Video: Empowering Maine's mightiest pollinators

For the last 30 years, Drummond, professor of insect ecology at the University of Maine, has studied the biology, ecology, disease susceptibility and pesticide exposure of Maine's 275 native species of bees, as well as the ...

Research on watermelons and wildflowers gaining some buzz

Besides adding beauty to a field of watermelons, colorful patches of wildflowers might also provide benefits that would improve the quality and increase the yield of one of South Carolina's most important vegetable crops.

UN science report warns of fewer bees, other pollinators

Many species of wild bees, butterflies and other critters that pollinate plants are shrinking toward extinction, and the world needs to do something about it before our food supply suffers, a new United Nations scientific ...

Threat posed by 'pollen thief' bees uncovered

A new University of Stirling study has uncovered the secrets of 'pollen thief' bees - which take pollen from flowers but fail to act as effective pollinators - and the threat they pose to certain plant species.

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