Killer bees may increase food supplies for native bees

Aggressive African bees were accidentally released in Brazil in 1957. As "killer bees" spread northward, David Roubik, staff scientist at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, began a 17-year study that revealed that ...

How tree diversity regulates invading forest pests

A national-scale study of U.S. forests found strong relationships between the diversity of native tree species and the number of nonnative pests that pose economic and ecological threats to the nation's forests.

European earthworms decrease species diversity in North America

European earthworms are responsible for the decline in species diversity in North American Forests. Scientists from the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) and the Leipzig University, together with ...

Canker disease in eucalyptus in the Basque Country

The first experiences with exotic species in the Basque Country, and alternative to Pinus radiata, were undertaken in 1957, concretely in Laukiz, Lezama and Alonsotegui (Muro, 1975) where the eucalyptus, amongst other forest ...

Wild bees thrive after severe forest fires

Early results from a two-year study in southern Oregon suggest that moderate and severe forest fires create conditions that lead to greater abundance and diversity of wild bees.

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