Fast and accurate synchronization in the 'blink' of an eye

"Let's synchronize our watches." It's the classic line before a group goes out on a mission. We are all familiar with the concept of synchronized clocks - less known, but equally important, is that wireless devices need to ...

Entanglement in a flash (w/ video)

(Phys.org) —JQI researchers under the direction of Chris Monroe have produced quantum entanglement between a single atom's motion and its spin state thousands of times faster than previously reported, demonstrating unprecedented ...

New method developed for synchronizing clocks

Maintaining the correct time is no longer just a matter of keeping your watch wound -- especially when it comes to computers, telecommunications, and other complex systems. The clocks in these devices must stay accurate to ...

Peering into the never before seen (w/ Video)

(PhysOrg.com) -- Scientists can now peer into the inner workings of catalyst nanoparticles 3,000 times smaller than a human hair within nanoseconds. The findings point the way toward future work that could greatly improve ...

Measuring protein movements with nanosecond resolution

Researchers at the Department of Chemistry at the Technische Universität München (TUM, Germany) have developed a method that allows the observation of local movements in proteins on a time scale of nanoseconds to microseconds. ...

Vibrations key to efficiency of green fluorescent protein

University of California, Berkeley, chemists have discovered the secret to the success of a jellyfish protein whose green glow has made it the darling of biologists and the subject of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Physiology or ...

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Nanosecond

A nanosecond (ns) is one billionth of a second (10−9 s). One nanosecond is to one second as one second is to 31.7 years.

The word nanosecond is formed by the prefix nano and the unit second. Its symbol is ns.

A nanosecond is equal to 1000 picoseconds or 1⁄1000 microsecond. Because the next SI unit is 1000 times larger, times of 10−8 and 10−7 seconds are typically expressed as tens or hundreds of nanoseconds.

Times of this magnitude are commonly encountered in telecommunications, pulsed lasers and some areas of electronics. Some notable measurements in this range include:

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