A new way to cool down electronic devices, recover waste heat

Using electronic devices for too long can cause them to overheat, which might slow them down, damage their components or even make them explode or catch fire. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Nano Letters have developed ...

Big data at the nanoscale

An international team of scientists, including physicists from the University of Luxembourg, have reported a comprehensive view-point on how machine learning approaches can be used in Nanoscience to analyze and extract new ...

Magnetite nanowires with sharp insulating transition

Magnetite (Fe3O4) is best known as a magnetic iron ore, and is the source of lodestone. It also has potential as a high-temperature resistor in electronics. In new research led by Osaka University, published in Nano Letters, ...

DNA origami to scale-up molecular motors

Researchers have successfully used DNA origami to make smooth-muscle-like contractions in large networks of molecular motor systems, a discovery which could be applied in molecular robotics.

Graphene flakes for future transistors

Graphene nanoflakes are promising for possible applications in the field of nanoelectronics, and the subject of a study recently published in Nano Letters. These hexagonal nanostructures exhibit quantum effects for modulating ...

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Nano Letters

Nano Letters is a peer-reviewed scientific journal, published since 2001 by the American Chemical Society. Nano Letters is currently indexed in: CAS, SCOPUS, EBSCOhost, British Library, PubMed, and Web of Science.

The Co-Editors are Paul Alivisatos and Charles Lieber

Nano Letters has an ISI Impact Factor of 10.371 as reported by the 2008 Journal Citation Reports by Thomson Reuters.

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