Mycotoxin detection by graphene field-effect transistor

The struggle for living space concerns not only people and animals but can refer also to molds. When mold (fungi) contaminated the food in case of bad environment for its development it states to produce second metabolites—mycotoxins—to ...

Decades-old puzzle of the ecology of soil animals solved

An international research team led by the University of Göttingen has deciphered the defence mechanism of filamentous fungi. Moulds are a preferred food source for small animals. As fungi cannot escape predation by running ...

Mealworms may turn infected wheat into cash

The potential solution discovered by University of Saskatchewan researchers for producers stuck with unsellable fusarium-infected wheat may actually put cash in the farmers' pockets and open up a new worm-based niche market ...

Detecting potentially harmful mycotoxins in beer

Beer is one of the world's most popular alcoholic beverages. But, made with barley, brews can contain low levels of mycotoxins, which are produced by fungi that can contaminate grains. Although not a major health threat, ...

Cheers to better beer and disease resistance

For the first time in nearly a century drinkers will be able to taste beer made from Chevallier, the classic heritage barley from the Victorian period.

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Mycotoxin

A mycotoxin (from Greek μύκης (mykes, mukos) “fungus” and Latin (toxicum) “poison”) is a toxic secondary metabolite produced by organisms of the fungus kingdom, commonly known as molds. The term ‘mycotoxin’ is usually reserved for the toxic chemical products produced by fungi that readily colonize crops. One mold species may produce many different mycotoxins and/or the same mycotoxin as another species.

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