Related topics: cells · genes · muscle · stem cells · nerve cells

Scientists discover rare superfast muscles in mouse legs

You might think that only DC Comics superhero The Flash could run at a speed of 200 strides per second. But in the animal world, special muscles—called "superfast muscles"—can move as fast as Barry Allen.

Scientists discover secreted protein helps repair and grow muscles

Scientists from Tokyo Metropolitan University have discovered that a protein called platelet-derived growth factor subunit B (PDGF-B) is continuously secreted from skeletal muscle cells and helps to repair muscles by encouraging ...

Starvation shown to cause cell remodeling

Body cells burn off fat reserves when nutrient supply from food ceases. A team led by Professor Volker Haucke and Dr. Wonyul Jang from the Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) has now discovered ...

Mini but mighty: Tiny WNT messengers help muscles grow

WNT signaling is crucial for the development of organisms and the maintenance of tissue homeostasis, since the WNT messengers are involved in a variety of cellular functions. In skeletal muscle, for example, they can increase ...

Scientists discover changes in aging stem cells

Aging, and the struggle against it, has long been a popular theme in classic and modern literature in human history. From the ill-fated Qin Shi Huang's expedition to the sea searching for eternal life to Count Dracula's popularity ...

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Muscle

Muscle (from Latin musculus, diminutive of mus "mouse") is the contractile tissue of the body and is derived from the mesodermal layer of embryonic germ cells. Muscle cells contain contractile filaments that move past each other and change the size of the cell. They are classified as skeletal, cardiac, or smooth muscles. Their function is to produce force and cause motion. Muscles can cause either locomotion of the organism itself or movement of internal organs. Cardiac and smooth muscle contraction occurs without conscious thought and is necessary for survival. Examples are the contraction of the heart and peristalsis which pushes food through the digestive system. Voluntary contraction of the skeletal muscles is used to move the body and can be finely controlled. Examples are movements of the eye, or gross movements like the quadriceps muscle of the thigh. There are two broad types of voluntary muscle fibers: slow twitch and fast twitch. Slow twitch fibers contract for long periods of time but with little force while fast twitch fibers contract quickly and powerfully but fatigue very rapidly.

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