Related topics: cells · genes · muscle · stem cells · nerve cells

The meat, the muscle, and the motion of cell fusion

One day Prof. Eldad Tzahor peered into a microscope in his lab and saw steak. As part of Tzahor's research into repairing muscle tissue, Dr. Tamar Eigler, a postdoctoral fellow in his lab at the Weizmann Institute of Science, ...

New cell database paints fuller picture of muscle repair

When a muscle becomes injured, it repairs itself using a flurry of cellular activity, with stem cells splitting and differentiating into many types of specialized cells, each playing an important role in the healing process.

Medical experiments in space

The SpaceX carrier rocket lifted off from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, U.S. early on Thursday morning, Central European Time. The 'Cosmic Kiss' mission's four crew members will travel to the International Space ...

First 3D-bioprinted structured Wagyu beef-like meat

Scientists from Osaka University used stem cells isolated from Wagyu cows to 3D-print a meat alternative containing muscle, fat, and blood vessels arranged to closely resemble conventional steaks. This work may help usher ...

How cancer cells make lactic acid to survive

For the first time, researchers have shown how cancer cells reprogram themselves to produce lactic acid and to tolerate the acidic environment that exists around tumors. The finding could lead to a whole new direction for ...

Getting oxygenated blood to exercising muscles

ETH Zurich Professor Katrien De Bock and her team have discovered a certain type of blood vessel cell in muscles that multiplies rapidly upon exercise, thereby forming new blood vessels. Researchers can use this to find novel ...

Receptor location in heart plays a key role in their function

In the heart there are two different subtypes of beta-adrenergic receptors—beta1 and beta2—which are activated by the stress hormones adrenaline and noradrenaline. They both trigger the strongest stimulation of the heart ...

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Muscle

Muscle (from Latin musculus, diminutive of mus "mouse") is the contractile tissue of the body and is derived from the mesodermal layer of embryonic germ cells. Muscle cells contain contractile filaments that move past each other and change the size of the cell. They are classified as skeletal, cardiac, or smooth muscles. Their function is to produce force and cause motion. Muscles can cause either locomotion of the organism itself or movement of internal organs. Cardiac and smooth muscle contraction occurs without conscious thought and is necessary for survival. Examples are the contraction of the heart and peristalsis which pushes food through the digestive system. Voluntary contraction of the skeletal muscles is used to move the body and can be finely controlled. Examples are movements of the eye, or gross movements like the quadriceps muscle of the thigh. There are two broad types of voluntary muscle fibers: slow twitch and fast twitch. Slow twitch fibers contract for long periods of time but with little force while fast twitch fibers contract quickly and powerfully but fatigue very rapidly.

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