Prehistoric shark hid its largest teeth

Early sharks that lived 300 to 400 million years ago not only dropped their lower jaws downward but rotated them outward when opening their mouths. This enabled them to make the best of their largest, sharpest and inward-facing ...

Linkage in catfish head could inspire new underwater robots

New research into how catfish capture prey provides an unparalleled view of the internal mechanics of fish skulls and could inspire the design of new underwater robots. Although lead researcher Aaron M. Olsen of Brown University ...

Tadpoles create their own air bubbles to breathe

A pair of researchers at the University of Connecticut, has found that hatchling tadpoles create their own air bubbles in order to breathe. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Kurt Schwenk and ...

Decoding the fundamental mechanisms of human salivary lubrication

An interdisciplinary team of scientists led by the University of Leeds have uncovered the fundamental mechanism by which human saliva lubricates our mouth. Their multi-scale study opens the door to advancing dry mouth therapies ...

New species found in whale shark mouth

A whale shark's mouth might not seem like the most hospitable environment for a home, but Japanese researchers have found there's no place like it for a newly-discovered shrimp-like creature.

Cardinalfish caught sneaking a bit on the side

Scientists have revealed the torrid, adulterous love lives of the mouth-brooding cardinalfish, with cuckoldry going hand-in-hand with cannibalism of the young.

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Mouth

The mouth is the first portion of the alimentary canal that receives food and saliva. The oral mucosa is the mucous membrane epithelium lining the inside of the mouth.

In addition to its primary role as the beginning of the digestive system, in humans the mouth also plays a significant role in communication. While primary aspects of the voice are produced in the throat, the tongue, lips, and jaw are also needed to produce the range of sounds included in human language. Another non-digestive function of the mouth is its role in secondary social and/or sexual activity, such as kissing.

The mouth, normally moist, is lined with a mucous membrane, and contains the teeth. The lips mark the transition from mucous membrane to skin, which covers most of the body.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA