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Study finds increased education lowers crime

New research from The CIBC Centre for Human Capital and Productivity at The University of Western Ontario shows that education, and related education-based initiatives, can reduce crime rates, improve health, lower mortality ...

Microbiome may have shaped early human populations

We humans have an exceptional age structure compared to other animals: Our children remain dependent on their parents for an unusually long period and our elderly live an extremely long time after they have stopped procreating.

Bones of Roman Britons provide new clues to dietary deprivation

Researchers at the University of Bradford have shown a link between the diet of Roman Britons and their mortality rates for the first time, overturning a previously-held belief about the quality of the Roman diet.

Tesla chief says self-driving cars just around corner

US electric car maker Tesla is developing technology that could see vehicles run on "full auto pilot" in as little as five or six years, according to its chief executive Elon Musk.

Newcastle disease gets new vaccine

A new vaccine for Newcastle disease (ND) in poultry has been developed by U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists in Athens, Ga. Using reverse genetics technology, the new vaccine is made from part of a virus that ...

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Population history of American indigenous peoples

It is estimated, based on archaeological data and written records from European settlers, that from 8 to 140 million indigenous people lived in the Americas when the 1492 voyage of Christopher Columbus began a historical period of large-scale European interaction with the Americas. European contact with what they called the "New World" led to the European colonization of the Americas, with millions of emigrants (willing and unwilling) from the "Old World" eventually resettling in the Americas.

While the population of Old World peoples in the Americas steadily grew in the centuries after Columbus, the population of the American indigenous peoples plummeted. This was somewhat caused by direct conflict and warfare with European colonizers and other Native American tribes, but probably mostly due to their susceptibility to old world diseases [smallpox, influenza, bubonic and pneumonic plagues, etc.] that they had never before been exposed to. The extent (and to a lesser extent the causes) of this population decline have long been the subject of debate.

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