Major findings help understand bacteria's 'superglue'

The discovery, published today in Nature Communications by researchers from La Trobe University and the University of Queensland, provides details on how proteins in the outer membrane of bacteria—the bacteria's 'superglue'—are ...

Powering a pacemaker with a patient's heartbeat

Implantable pacemakers have without doubt altered modern medicine, saving countless lives by regulating heart rhythm. But they have one serious shortcoming: Their batteries last only five to 12 years, at which point they ...

Squeezing cells into stem cells

EPFL scientists have developed a new method that turns cells into stem cells by "squeezing" them. The method paves the way for large-scale production of stem cells for medical purposes.

Sugar molecules lose their 'Cinderella' status

Carbohydrates are often considered the 'Cinderella' molecules of biology yet they are a feature of an increasing number of medicines, from small molecule drugs to protein therapeutics or vaccines.

Hot flashes? Thank evolution

A study of mortality and fertility patterns among seven species of wild apes and monkeys and their relatives, compared with similar data from hunter-gatherer humans, shows that menopause sets humans apart from other primates.

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