Related topics: gulf of mexico · oil spills · oil · invasive species · water

Bee decline threatens US crop production

The first-ever study to map U.S. wild bees suggests they are disappearing in the country's most important farmlands—from California's Central Valley to the Midwest's corn belt and the Mississippi River valley.

Snake lovers hit southern Illinois for annual migrations

You don't have to be a herpetologist to savor the slice of this federal forest where a stunning array of reptiles and amphibians congregates beneath soaring limestone bluffs overlooking the Mississippi River.

Remains of French ship being reassembled in Texas

A frigate carrying French colonists to the New World that sank in a storm off the Texas coast more than 300 years ago is being reassembled into a display that archeologists hope will let people walk over the hull and feel ...

Wild bee decline threatens US crop production

The first national study to map U.S. wild bees suggests they're disappearing in many of the country's most important farmlands—including California's Central Valley, the Midwest's corn belt, and the Mississippi River valley.

Common US snake actually three different species

New research reveals that a snake found across a huge swath of the Eastern United States is actually three different species. Published in the journal Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, analyses of the yellow-bellied ...

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Mississippi River

The Mississippi River is the second-longest river in the United States, with a length of 2,320 miles (3,730 km) from its source in Lake Itasca in Minnesota to its mouth in the Gulf of Mexico.

The Mississippi River is part of the Missouri-Mississippi river system, which is the largest river system in North America and among the largest in the world: by length (3,900 miles (6,300 km)), it is the fourth longest, and by its average discharge of 572,000 cu ft/s (16,200 m³/s), it is the tenth largest.

The name Mississippi is derived from the Ojibwe word misi-ziibi ("Great River") or gichi-ziibi ("Big River").

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA