Related topics: gulf of mexico · oil spills · oil · invasive species · water

Asian carp roundup in Kentucky opens new front in battle

Like a slow-motion, underwater cattle drive, wildlife officials in a half-dozen aluminum boats used pulses of electricity and sound on a recent gray morning to herd schools of Asian carp toward 1,000-foot-long (305 meters) ...

In Cuba, cleaner rivers follow greener farming

When the Soviet Union collapsed in the early 1990's, food production on the island of Cuba was disrupted—as the supply of Russian fertilizers, pesticides, tractors, and oil dried up. Under the stress of an imminent food ...

Moon river: Rocket part ferried on the mighty Mississippi

With a brass band playing and a parade of workers sporting Mardi Gras beads, a huge component of a new rocket system was wheeled slowly from a New Orleans spacecraft factory on Wednesday to a barge that will float it up the ...

Study links Asian carp with Mississippi River fish drop

Sport fish have declined significantly in portions of the Upper Mississippi River infested with Asian carp, adding evidence to fears about the invader's threat to native species, according to a new study.

Louisiana hopes to fight coast erosion by mimicking nature

Back when the Mississippi River flowed wild, its ever-shifting waters acted as a continent-sized earth mover, picking up sand and dirt from the North, depositing it in the Delta region and eventually creating the land that ...

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Mississippi River

The Mississippi River is the second-longest river in the United States, with a length of 2,320 miles (3,730 km) from its source in Lake Itasca in Minnesota to its mouth in the Gulf of Mexico.

The Mississippi River is part of the Missouri-Mississippi river system, which is the largest river system in North America and among the largest in the world: by length (3,900 miles (6,300 km)), it is the fourth longest, and by its average discharge of 572,000 cu ft/s (16,200 m³/s), it is the tenth largest.

The name Mississippi is derived from the Ojibwe word misi-ziibi ("Great River") or gichi-ziibi ("Big River").

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA