Shale could be long-term home for problematic nuclear waste

Shale, the source of the United States' current natural gas boom, could help solve another energy problem: what to do with radioactive waste from nuclear power plants. The unique properties of the sedimentary rock and related ...

'Tracking in Caves': On the trail of pre-historic man

In remote caves of the Pyrenees, lie precious remnants of the Ice Age undisturbed: foot and hand prints of prehistoric hunters. The tracks have remained untouched for millennia and are in excellent condition. Dr. Tilman Lenssen-Erz ...

Australian lake untouched by climate change

Researchers at the University of Adelaide have found that a lake on an island off the coast of Queensland has been relatively untouched by changes in climate for the past 7000 years, and has so far also resisted the impact ...

New frontier for scaling up online classes: credit

In 15 years of teaching, University of Pennsylvania classicist Peter Struck has guided perhaps a few hundred students annually in his classes on Greek and Roman mythology through the works of Homer, Sophocles, Aeschylus and ...

Ocean floor sediments explain arid U.S. Southwest

(Phys.org)—Surface-dwelling algae adjust their biochemistry to surface temperatures. As they die and sink to the bottom, they build a sedimentary record of sea-surface temperature across millennia. Brown's work on surface ...

Sea level controls carbon accumulation in the Everglades

How much carbon is stored in the organic soils of tropical wetlands is becoming an important question as erosion, agriculture, and global climate change slowly set into motion a series of processes that could potentially ...

Curiosity's sundial carries a message of hope

While Curiosity is definitely loaded up with some of the most high-tech instruments ever made to investigate the surface of Mars, it also carries a very low-tech instrument: a sundial, which can be used to determine the position ...

Germany may be birthplace of European music and art

The remains of the world's oldest musical instruments and human figurines suggest that music and artistic depictions of the human form may have first developed in Germany around 40,000 years ago, say researchers.

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Millennium

A millennium (plural millennia) is a period of time equal to one thousand years (1,000)—from the Latin phrase mille, thousand, and annus, year—often but not necessarily related numerically to a particular dating system.

For example, a millennium could start at the beginning of the year 289 and finish at the beginning of the year 1289.

Sometimes, it is used specifically for periods of one thousand years that begin at the starting point (initial reference point) of the calendar in consideration (typically the year "1"), or in later years which are whole number multiples of a thousand years after it. The term can also refer to an interval of time beginning on any date. Frequently in the latter case (and sometimes also in the former) it may have religious or theological implications (see millenarianism). Sometimes in religious use, such an interval called a "millennium" might be interpreted less precisely, i.e., not always being exactly 1000 years long.

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