Related topics: brain · cells · protein

Marine extremophiles: The basal level of the food chain

In nutrient-poor deep-sea sediments, microbes belonging to Archaea have outcompeted bacterial microorganisms for millions of years. Efficiently scavenging dead cells makes them the basal producers in the food chain.

Feeling the strain: Shear effects in magnetoelectric switching

The high resolution and wealth of data provided by an experiment at Diamond can lead to unexpected discoveries. The piezoelectric properties of the ceramic perovskite PMN-PT (0.68Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3–0.32PbTiO3) are widely ...

A microscopic topographic map of cellular function

The flow of traffic through our nation's highways and byways is meticulously mapped and studied, but less is known about how materials in cells travel. Now, a team of researchers at the University of Missouri is challenging ...

Pulsed electron beams shed light on plastics production

Plastics are all around us—they make up our water bottles, trash bags, packing materials, toys, containers, and more. About 300 million tons of plastic are produced worldwide each year, yet the details of what goes on at ...

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Microscope

A microscope (from the Greek: μικρός, mikrós, "small" and σκοπεῖν, skopeîn, "to look" or "see") is an instrument for viewing objects that are too small to be seen by the naked or unaided eye. The science of investigating small objects using such an instrument is called microscopy. The term microscopic means minute or very small, not visible with the eye unless aided by a microscope. Anton Van Leeuwenhoek's new, improved microscope allowed people to see things no human had ever seen before.

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