Related topics: brain · cells · protein

Quantum communication: making two from one

In the future, quantum physics could become the guarantor of secure information technology. To achieve this, individual particles of light—photons—are used for secure transmission of data. Findings by physicists from ...

Probing battery hotspots for safer energy storage

Researchers are striving to make tomorrow's batteries charge faster and store more energy. But these conveniences come with safety challenges, like more heat produced in a battery. For the first time, a team of researchers ...

The most stable microscope in the world

Ph.D. candidate Irene Battisti of the Leiden Institute of Physics has developed the most vibration-free cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope in the world. The new microscope could shed light on unconventional superconductivity.

Image: Smart particles

Down to the microscopic level, nanoparticles show promising properties. A team of experts in Italy has spent years tailoring tiny inorganic materials and analysing their behaviour. Some have magnetic properties, others are ...

Multistep self-assembly opens door to new reconfigurable materials

Self-assembling synthetic materials come together when tiny, uniform building blocks interact and form a structure. However, nature lets materials like proteins of varying size and shape assemble, allowing for complex architectures ...

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Microscope

A microscope (from the Greek: μικρός, mikrós, "small" and σκοπεῖν, skopeîn, "to look" or "see") is an instrument for viewing objects that are too small to be seen by the naked or unaided eye. The science of investigating small objects using such an instrument is called microscopy. The term microscopic means minute or very small, not visible with the eye unless aided by a microscope. Anton Van Leeuwenhoek's new, improved microscope allowed people to see things no human had ever seen before.

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