Related topics: brain · cells · protein

New microscopes unravel the mysteries of brain organization

The secret of capturing exquisite brain images with a new generation of custom-built microscopes is revealed today in Nature Methods. The new microscopes, known as mesoSPIMs, can image the minute detail of brain tissue down ...

Creating new opportunities from nanoscale materials

A hundred years ago, "2d" meant a two-penny, or 1-inch, nail. Today, "2-D" encompasses a broad range of atomically thin flat materials, many with exotic properties not found in the bulk equivalents of the same materials, ...

Moving faster in a crowd

Cell particles move more quickly through a crowded cellular environment when the crowding molecules are non-uniformly distributed. New research also shows that particle transport in crowded cells can actually be faster than ...

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Microscope

A microscope (from the Greek: μικρός, mikrós, "small" and σκοπεῖν, skopeîn, "to look" or "see") is an instrument for viewing objects that are too small to be seen by the naked or unaided eye. The science of investigating small objects using such an instrument is called microscopy. The term microscopic means minute or very small, not visible with the eye unless aided by a microscope. Anton Van Leeuwenhoek's new, improved microscope allowed people to see things no human had ever seen before.

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