Drones can determine the shape of a room by listening

Imagine a loudspeaker is placed in a room with a few microphones. When the loudspeaker emits a sound impulse, the microphones receive several delayed responses as the sound reverberates from each wall in the room. These first-order ...

Confirmed: In space no one can hear you scream

The old tagline "in space no one can hear you scream" has been confirmed by a South African mother loudly shouting for her children to tidy their room from 33,000 meters above the ground. Or not so loudly, as the case appears ...

Research team introduces wearable audio dataset

Researchers studying wearable listening technology now have a new data set to use, thanks to University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign graduate student Ryan Corey and his team.

How acoustics detected artillery in WWI

During World War I, William Lawrence Bragg led a team of engineers in the development of an acoustic method to locate enemy artillery, work that was so successful that it was soon used widely throughout the British army.

Transparent loudspeakers and mics that let your skin play music

An international team of researchers affiliated with UNIST has presented an innovative wearable technology that turns the user's skin into a loudspeaker. This breakthrough was led by Professor Hyunhyub Ko in the School of ...

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Microphone

A microphone (colloquially called a mic or mike; both pronounced /ˈmaɪk/) is an acoustic-to-electric transducer or sensor that converts sound into an electrical signal. In 1877, Emile Berliner invented the first microphone used as a telephone voice transmitter. Microphones are used in many applications such as telephones, tape recorders, karaoke systems, hearing aids, motion picture production, live and recorded audio engineering, FRS radios, megaphones, in radio and television broadcasting and in computers for recording voice, speech recognition, VoIP, and for non-acoustic purposes such as ultrasonic checking or knock sensors.

Most microphones today use electromagnetic induction (dynamic microphone), capacitance change (condenser microphone), piezoelectric generation, or light modulation to produce an electrical voltage signal from mechanical vibration.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA