Graphene sheets enable ultrasound transmitters

University of California, Berkeley, physicists have used graphene to build lightweight ultrasonic loudspeakers and microphones, enabling people to mimic bats or dolphins' ability to use sound to communicate and gauge the ...

Transparent loudspeakers and mics that let your skin play music

An international team of researchers affiliated with UNIST has presented an innovative wearable technology that turns the user's skin into a loudspeaker. This breakthrough was led by Professor Hyunhyub Ko in the School of ...

Sperm whale 'clicks' help scientists understand behaviour

Scientists have recorded thousands of hours of "clicks" that sperm whales make to forage for food and communicate, helping them better understand the behaviour of one of the Southern Ocean's key predators.

Scientists capture sounds of volcanic thunder

Researchers report in a new study that they've documented rumblings of volcanic thunder for the first time, a feat considered nearly impossible by many volcanologists.

page 1 from 8

Microphone

A microphone (colloquially called a mic or mike; both pronounced /ˈmaɪk/) is an acoustic-to-electric transducer or sensor that converts sound into an electrical signal. In 1877, Emile Berliner invented the first microphone used as a telephone voice transmitter. Microphones are used in many applications such as telephones, tape recorders, karaoke systems, hearing aids, motion picture production, live and recorded audio engineering, FRS radios, megaphones, in radio and television broadcasting and in computers for recording voice, speech recognition, VoIP, and for non-acoustic purposes such as ultrasonic checking or knock sensors.

Most microphones today use electromagnetic induction (dynamic microphone), capacitance change (condenser microphone), piezoelectric generation, or light modulation to produce an electrical voltage signal from mechanical vibration.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA