Microbial dark matter dominates Earth's environments

Uncultured microbes—those whose characteristics have never been described because they have not yet been grown in a lab culture—could be dominating nearly all the environments on Earth except for the human body, according ...

How plants harness microbes to get nutrients

A Rutgers-led team has discovered how plants harness microbes in soil to get nutrients, a process that could be exploited to boost crop growth, fight weeds and slash the use of polluting fertilizers and herbicides.

Gut microbes' role in mammals' evolution starts to become clearer

An international collaboration led by Oregon State University scientists has made a key advance toward understanding which of the trillions of gut microbes may play important roles in how humans and other mammals evolve.

Microbes hitch a ride inland on coastal fog

Fog can act as a vector for microbes, transferring them long distances and introducing them into new environments. So reports an analysis of the microbiology of coastal fog, recently published in the journal Science of the ...

Sequencing the genomes of a microbial ecosystem

Corn stalks rustle and tractors trundle along, their wheels grinding into the Kansas soil. While it seems like farmers and machinery conduct most of the work on a modern farm, much of the heavy lifting goes on below the surface. ...

Why do some microbes live in your gut while others don't?

Trillions of tiny microbes and bacteria live in your gut, each with their own set of genes. These gut microbes can have both beneficial and harmful effects on your health, from protecting you against inflammation to causing ...

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