Transparent electronics research gains momentum

Transparent electronics are the future, according to researchers including José A. Flores-Livas and Miglė Graužinytė from the research group headed by Stefan Goedecker, Professor of Computational Physics at the University ...

The limits of hematite

Hematite and other transition metal oxides are used in the renewable production of hydrogen. Researchers at the TU Darmstadt have discovered why the materials reached their limits doing so. Their results have now been published ...

Golden nanoglue completes the wonder material

In a recent study, scientists at the University of Oulu have developed a nanojunction, joining one of the most promising novel materials, molybdenum disulfide, with nickel.

Silver circuits on foil allow curved touchscreens

Microscopically fine conductor paths are required on the surfaces of smartphone touchscreens. At the edges of the appliances, these microscopic circuit paths come together to form larger connective pads. Until now, these ...

To conduct, or to insulate? That is the question

A new study has discovered mysterious behaviour of a material that acts like an insulator in certain measurements, but simultaneously acts like a conductor in others. In an insulator, electrons are largely stuck in one place, ...

From metal to insulator and back again

New work from Carnegie's Russell Hemley and Ivan Naumov hones in on the physics underlying the recently discovered fact that some metals stop being metallic under pressure. Their work is published in Physical Review Letters.

Using E-petals for making stretchable metal conductors

The research beat goes on in stretchable electronics. Scientists work on solutions for ultraflexible, stretchable, and wearable electronics and pursue advanced materials toward that end. Dr. Peter Harrop, chairman of market ...

Smaller than small: Why we measure the space between atoms

We study the movement of incredibly small things. How small is small? Think smaller than "nano." Think smaller than atoms themselves. We measure the infinitesimally small shifts in the positions of atoms to electrical forces. ...

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