Related topics: cancer cells

Building human muscle genes in the DNA of baker's yeast

Biotechnologist Pascale Daran-Lapujade and her group at Delft University of Technology managed to build human muscle genes in the DNA of baker's yeast. This is the first time researchers have successfully placed such a vital ...

Metabolically engineered bacterium produces lutein

Lutein is classified as a xanthophyll chemical that is abundant in egg yolk, fruits, and vegetables. It protects the eye from oxidative damage from radiation and reduces the risk of eye diseases including macular degeneration ...

Effect of environmental contaminants on the health of pet cats

Companion animals are in close contact with human surroundings, and there is growing concern about the effects of harmful substances on the health of pet cats. This study investigated the potential health effects of organohalogen ...

Secret language of cells? New cell computations uncovered

Throughout evolution, individual cells have been making successful decisions on their own, even while forming parts of vast networks, such as neurons and glia in the human brain. Now scientists from King Abdullah University ...

Metabolic protein explains how flies choose 'healthy' food

Many animals, including humans, have a preference for nutrient-balanced diets. Among all essential nutrients, multicellular organisms need to consume the building blocks of proteins, called amino acids, in order to build ...

Cable bacteria: Electric marvels of microbial world

The emergence of multicellularity, requiring complex interactions between different groups of individual cells for metabolic and physiological benefits, is a great success in the history of biology. While multicellularity ...

How the body senses an essential amino acid

A new paper from Whitehead Institute researchers reveals how mice sense an essential amino acid called leucine, which many people get from eating fish, eggs, or nuts. Down the line, the work could inform research into creating ...

Understanding how microbiota thrive in their human hosts

A research team lead by scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Biology, Tübingen, Germany, has now made substantial progress in understanding how gut bacteria succeed in their human hosts on a molecular level. They ...

page 1 from 19