'Bisexual' beetles are simply inept, new study finds

Same-sex mating behaviour amongst male insects is much more likely to be due to incompetence, than sexual preference, male-male competition or evolutionary motivation—according to new research from the University of East ...

Mate-guarding behaviour favours a familiar face

Okayama University researchers confirm the role of mate-guarding in males for blocking the female's visual familiarity with rival males to improve mating success in a medaka fish model.

Birds choose sweet-smelling mates

For most animals, scent is the instant messenger of choice for quickly exchanging personal profiles. Scientists, however, have long dismissed birds as odor-eschewing luddites that don't take advantage of scent-based communications.

Females butterflies can smell if a male butterfly is inbred

The mating success of male butterflies is often lower if they are inbred. But how do female butterflies know which males to avoid? New research reveals that inbred male butterflies produce significantly less sex pheromones, ...

Females choose mates for their personalities, study shows

Adventurous females choose mates with similar personalities, regardless of the male's appearance and other assets, according to research led by the University of Exeter. This is the first study to show that the non-sexual ...

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