Picky female sparrows may be more unfaithful

Picky female sparrows may be more unfaithful, new Imperial research suggests. Cheating on social partners is common in birds, and there are clear benefits to males who can raise more offspring without investing in their care. ...

'Bisexual' beetles are simply inept, new study finds

Same-sex mating behaviour amongst male insects is much more likely to be due to incompetence, than sexual preference, male-male competition or evolutionary motivation—according to new research from the University of East ...

Not every partnership is about sex

Many species form long-term partnerships in life. When we see such pair bonds, our first assumption tends to be that the two individuals are a male and female, and the partnership is based on mating.

Reef fish study reveals migratory mateship

New UTS research confirms that, when it comes to rabbitfish couples, appearances can be deceptive, raising fundamental questions about pairing, reproduction and social systems.

Birds choose sweet-smelling mates

For most animals, scent is the instant messenger of choice for quickly exchanging personal profiles. Scientists, however, have long dismissed birds as odor-eschewing luddites that don't take advantage of scent-based communications.

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