Spreading the load on fisheries through balanced harvesting

A more balanced approach to harvesting fish could slow down fisheries-induced evolution and result in other conservation benefits, according to collaborative research from UC's School of Mathematics and Statistics.

What drives biological synchrony?

Ecologists traditionally attribute population explosions, be they of diseases or animals, to broad environmental conditions. But new data suggest that other factors may drive "synchrony": rapid, widespread rises and falls ...

Researchers unravel genetic web to help target diseases

(Phys.org) —Like a complex wiring system, the genetic network within a cell is an interconnected web of strands communicating to ensure the proper function of an organism. At Rutgers–Camden, computational biologists are ...

Generosity leads to evolutionary success, biologists show

With new insights into the classical game theory match-up known as the "Prisoner's Dilemma," University of Pennsylvania biologists offer a mathematically based explanation for why cooperation and generosity have evolved in ...

Taking the gamble out of DNA sequencing

Two USC scientists have developed an algorithm that could help make DNA sequencing affordable enough for clinics – and could be useful to researchers of all stripes.

Doing the math for how songbirds learn to sing

(Phys.org)—Scientists studying how songbirds stay on key have developed a statistical explanation for why some things are harder for the brain to learn than others.

Grandmas made humans live longer

Computer simulations provide new mathematical support for the "grandmother hypothesis" – a famous theory that humans evolved longer adult lifespans than apes because grandmothers helped feed their grandchildren.

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