Mysterious ocean-floor trails show Arctic sponges on the move

The aquatic animal known as the sponge is often described as entirely sessile: once they've settled in a spot and matured, they aren't generally thought of as moving around. But, according to a new study in the journal Current ...

Researchers go underwater to study how sponge species vanished

Researchers from Tel Aviv University (TAU) embarked on an underwater journey to solve a mystery: Why did sponges of the Agelas oroides species, which used to be common in the shallow waters along the Mediterranean coast of ...

Sponges as biomonitors of micropollution

Sponges are filter feeders that live on particulate matter—but they can also ingest microscopic fragments of plastics and other pollutants of anthropogenic origin. They can therefore serve as useful bioindicators of the ...

Native Hawaiian tiger cowries eat alien invasive species

Researchers at the University of Hawai'i (UH) at Mānoa's Hawai'i Institute of Marine Biology (HIMB) have just discovered that the Hawaiian tiger cowrie (Leho-kiko in Hawaiian) is a voracious predator of alien sponges such ...

Scientists first to develop rapid cell division in marine sponges

Vertebrate, insect, and plant cell lines are important tools for research in many disciplines, including human health, evolutionary and developmental biology, agriculture and toxicology. Cell lines have been established for ...

Viruses as modulators of interactions in marine ecosystems

The Oceans not only host large predators such as sharks or orcas. Even in the realm of the microscopic, some unicellular species consume others. Choanoflagellates belong to these unicellular predators. They are widespread ...

Great Barrier Reef hiding priceless tech treasures

Move over Elon Musk and Mark Zuckerberg – University of Queensland scientists say the humble sea sponge or snail could unlock technological breakthroughs that might alter the course of human existence.

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