Sugar brings a lot of carbon dioxide into the deeper sea

In the sunlit surface layer of the ocean, photosynthetic microalgae such as diatoms convert more carbon dioxide into biomass than Earth's tropical forests. Like land plants, diatoms sequester carbon dioxide into polymeric ...

How marine algae could help feed the world

Our planet faces a growing food crisis. According to the United Nations, more than 800 million people are regularly undernourished. By 2050, an additional 2 to 3 billion new guests will join the planetary dinner table.

Microalgae could play key role in relieving climate warming

Think better living through marine microalgae, as it may become crucial to mitigate atmospheric greenhouse gases, reduce carbon dioxide emissions from commercial agriculture and steady the global climate, according to Cornell-led ...

Marine microalgae, a new sustainable food and fuel source

Taken from the bottom of the marine food chain, microalgae may soon become a top-tier contender to combat global warming, climate change and food insecurity, according to a study published in the journal Oceanography (December ...

Team makes breakthrough toward fish-free aquaculture feed

Dartmouth College scientists have discovered that marine microalgae can completely replace the wild fish oil currently used to feed tilapia, the second most farmed fish in the world and the most widely farmed in the United ...

page 1 from 2