An animal to feed your eco-car

Researchers at the University of Bergen and Uni Research have found that a certain type of tunicate - ascidiacea - can be used as a renewable source of biofuel and fish food. This is particularly good news for the growing ...

Tool for seafood contamination

Since the horse meat saga began in 2012, some of us have decided to eat more fish and seafood - after all, we have been told they are better for our health. Well, that may not be quite true today. While EU law allows consumers ...

Sustainable fishing in light of Omega-3 demand

Finding a more eco-friendly way to boost the amount of healthy fats in fish bred for human consumption is the main aim of a new Flinders University PhD project.

'Ocean Health Index': Global ocean health gets passing grade

Using a new comprehensive index designed to assess the benefits to people of healthy oceans, scientists have evaluated the ecological, social, economic, and political conditions for every coastal country in the world. Their ...

Genome provides new weapon against sea lice

An international team of researchers has now sequenced nearly the entire genetic material of the sea louse. On 1 March the Institute of Marine Research gave the world open access to this research source, which could enable ...

8 species of wild fish have been detected in aquaculture feed

Researchers from the University of Oviedo have for the first time analysed a DNA fragment from commercial feed for aquarium cichlids, aquaculture salmon and marine fish in aquariums. The results show that in order to manufacture ...

Alternative fish feeds use less fishmeal and fish oils

As consumers eat more fish as part of a healthy diet, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists are helping producers meet this demand by developing new feeds that support sustainable aquaculture production.

Is this the perfect prawn?

(PhysOrg.com) -- After 10 years of careful breeding and research, scientists have developed what could be the world's most perfect prawn.

Marine aquaculture could feed growing world population

The oceans could become the source of more of humanity's food if steps are taken to expand and improve marine aquaculture, according to a study published in the December 2009 issue of BioScience.

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