Marine reserves are vital—but under pressure

A massive study of nearly 1800 tropical coral reefs around the world has found that marine reserves near heavily populated areas struggle to do their job—but are a vast improvement over having no protection at all.

Humans—the disturbing neighbours of reef sharks

Shark diversity and abundance is highest in remote reefs, as far as 25 hours away from main cities, reveals an international study conducted in the New Caledonia archipelago.

Marine reserves a solution to bycatch problem in oceans

Commercial fishermen may be able to catch more of the profitable fish they want with marine reserves than without them, according to a study in the journal PNAS led by the University of California, Davis. Using marine reserves ...

Healthy sharks sustain healthy oceans

A team from The University of Western Australia has completed a four month research expedition looking for signs of healthy coral reefs in the remote Kimberley. They observed an unexpectedly high number of sharks in the region, ...

Travel distances of juvenile fish key to better conservation

Marine reserves—sections of the ocean where fishing is prohibited—promote coral reef sustainability by preventing overfishing and increasing fish abundance and diversity. But to be effective, they need to be sized right, ...

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