Observing phytoplankton via satellite

Thanks to a new algorithm, researchers at the AWI can now use satellite data to determine in which parts of the ocean certain types of phytoplankton are dominant. In addition, they can identify toxic algal blooms and assess ...

Coral reefs 'weathering' the pressure of globalization

More information about the effects human activities have on Southeast Asian coral reefs has been revealed, with researchers looking at how large-scale global pressures, combined with the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) ...

Rethinking 'tipping points' in ecosystems and beyond

When a grassland becomes a desert, or a clearwater lake shifts to turbid, the consequences can be devastating for the species that inhabit them. These abrupt environmental changes, known as regime shifts, are the subject ...

Warming oceans are getting louder

One of the ocean's loudest creatures is smaller than you'd expect—and will get even louder and more troublesome to humans and sea life as the ocean warms, according to new research presented here at the Ocean Sciences Meeting ...

Microplastics sticking to Orkney's seagrass beds

Microplastics are accumulating in Orkney's seagrass beds at much higher rates than in the areas surrounding them. Marine scientists from Heriot-Watt surveyed a 100m transect of a seagrass bed in Orkney and found microplastics ...

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