Related topics: crops

Maize and bacteria: A 1-2 punch knocks copper out of stamp sand

Scientists have known for years that together, bacteria and plants can remediate contaminated sites. Ramakrishna Wusirika, of Michigan Technological University, has determined that how you add bacteria to the mix can make ...

EU execs back OK for genetically modified corn (Update)

The European Union moved closer to approving the cultivation of a second genetically modified corn on the continent despite years of objections by environmental groups and widespread apprehension about GMO food among European ...

Assessing the sustainability of aquaculture production

Global consumption of seafood has risen dramatically over the last decade, due to a growing population, increased affluence and changing eating habits - many now see seafood as a healthy alternative to meat. The EU is the ...

Global food prices drop for third month: UN

Global food prices dropped in July for the third month running, the United Nations said Thursday, driven largely by a fall in the value of cereals that are set to reach record production levels this year.

Monsanto drops bid to grow new GM foods in EU

US agro-chemicals giant Monsanto said Thursday it will drop all requests to be allowed to grow new genetically modified foods in the European Union, which has for years held up approval.

Maize trade disruption could have global ramifications

Disruptions to U.S. exports of maize (corn) could pose food security risks for many U.S. trade partners due to the lack of trade among other producing and importing nations, says a Michigan State University study.

A route for steeper, cheaper, and deeper roots

Plants with thinner roots can grow deeper, a trait which could be exploited in lands affected by drought and nutrient deprivation. New research, to be presented at the Society for Experimental Biology meeting on July 5, shows ...

Caterpillars attracted to plant SOS

Plants that emit an airborne distress signal in response to herbivory may actually attract more enemies, according to a new study published in the open-access journal Frontiers in Plant Science .

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