Scientists confirm a new 'magic number' for neutrons

An international collaboration led by scientists from the University of Hong Kong, RIKEN (Japan), and CEA (France) have used the RI Beam Factory (RIBF) at the RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-base Science to show that ...

Why the 'perfect' office temperature is a myth

It might be blisteringly hot outside, but if you work in an office building, the chances are it's always reassuringly cool (or cold, depending on your preference) once you walk inside.

Magic number colloidal clusters

Complexity in nature often results from self-assembly, and is considered particularly robust. Compact clusters of elemental particles can be shown to be of practical relevance, and are found in atomic nuclei, nanoparticles ...

ISOLDE mints isotopes of chromium

CERN's nuclear physics facility, ISOLDE, has minted a new coin in its impressive collection of isotopes. The facility has forged neutron-rich isotopes of the element chromium for the first time, and in prodigious quantities. ...

Nickel-78 confirmed to be doubly magic

(Phys.org)—Two teams of researchers working independently of one another and using wildly different approaches have confirmed nickel-78 to be doubly magic. In the first effort, an international team led by Louis Olivier ...

Has the magic gone from Calcium-52?

For the first time scientists have measured the radius of a calcium nucleus with 32 neutrons – indicating that nuclear physics theories don't describe atomic nuclei as well as previously thought.

A surprisingly long-lived excited state in a neutron-rich nucleus

The stability of an atomic nucleus strongly depends on the number of protons and neutrons it contains. Some nuclei can, in principle, live forever, whereas others last only a fraction of a second before decaying into different ...

Tests confirm nickel-78 is a 'doubly magic' isotope

The stability of atoms can vary considerably from one element to the next, and also between isotopes of the same element (whose nuclei contain the same number of protons but different numbers of neutrons). While many isotopes ...

page 1 from 2