Pushing the extra cold frontiers of superconducting science

Measuring the properties of superconducting materials in magnetic fields at close to absolute zero temperatures is difficult, but necessary to understand their quantum properties. How cold? Lower than 0.05 Kelvin (-272°C).

Tunable diamond string may hold key to quantum memory

A quantum internet promises completely secure communication. But using quantum bits or qubits to carry information requires a radically new piece of hardware—a quantum memory. This atomic-scale device needs to store quantum ...

Breaking bad metals with neutrons

By exploiting the properties of neutrons to probe electrons in a metal, a team of researchers led by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory has gained new insight into the behavior of correlated ...

Single-photon detector can count to four

Engineers have shown that a widely used method of detecting single photons can also count the presence of at least four photons at a time. The researchers say this discovery will unlock new capabilities in physics labs working ...

A curious quirk brings organic diode lasers one step closer

Since their invention in 1962, semiconductor diode lasers have revolutionized communications and made possible information storage and retrieval in CDs, DVDs and Blu-ray devices. These diode lasers use inorganic semiconductors ...

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