A hog in wolf's clothing

Human and wildlife conflict has increased along with expanding human populations, particularly when wildlife endanger humans or their livelihoods. Most research on human-wildlife conflict has focused on the ways tigers, wolves, ...

Mexico struggles to understand, solve, seaweed invasion

Mexico has spent $17 million to remove over a half-million tons of sargassum seaweed from its Caribbean beaches, and the problem doesn't seem likely to end any time soon, experts told an international conference Thursday.

Diet at the docks: Living and dying at the port of ancient Rome

Portus Romae was established in the middle of the first century AD and for well over 400 years was Rome's gateway to the Mediterranean. The port played a key role in funnelling imports—e.g. foodstuffs, wild animals, marble ...

Study: Aegean farmers replaced hunters of ancient Britain

A wave of migrants from what is now Greece and Turkey arrived in Britain some 6,000 years ago and virtually replaced the existing hunter-gatherer population, according to a study published Monday in the journal Nature.

Keeping genetic engineering localized

Genetic engineering tools that spread genes within a target species have the potential to humanely control harmful pests as well as eradicate parasitic diseases such as malaria.

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