A unique pattering strategy based on 'resist nanokirigami'

Photoresist-based patterning strategies have been standardized for decades since the invention of photolithography. However, there are still major challenges in the processing of certain functional structures. For example, ...

The tiny structures that mimic a cell's natural environment

When biologists study cells under a microscope, they look at them on flat surfaces that are nothing like the environment inside the human body. Now, researchers at NTNU have found a way to mimic some aspects of a cell's native ...

Patterning silicon at the one-nanometer scale

Researchers have developed an innovative technique for creating nanomaterials. These are materials only atoms wide. They draw on nanoscience to allow scientists to control their construction and behavior. The new electron ...

Mind the nanogap: Fast and sensitive oxygen gas sensors

Oxygen (O2) is an essential gas not only for us and most other lifeforms, but also for many industrial processes, biomedicine, and environmental monitoring applications. Given the importance of O2 and other gases, many researchers ...

Researchers in Sweden develop light emitter for quantum circuits

The promise of a quantum internet depends on the complexities of harnessing light to transmit quantum information over fiber optic networks. A potential step forward was reported today by researchers in Sweden who developed ...

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Lithography

Lithography (from Greek λίθος - lithos, 'stone' + γράφειν - graphein, 'to write') is a method for printing using a stone (lithographic limestone) or a metal plate with a completely smooth surface. Invented in 1796 by Bavarian author Alois Senefelder as a cheap method of publishing theatrical works, lithography can be used to print text or artwork onto paper or other suitable material.

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