Fats fighting back against bacteria

Droplets of fat inside our cells are helping the body's own defence system fight back against infection, University of Queensland researchers have discovered.

'Shark molecule' protects cholesterol enzyme from destruction

A team of scientists have shown in cell lines that a key cholesterol synthesis enzyme—squalene monooxygenase (SM) – is controlled by the levels of its target molecule, squalene. The findings, published in international ...

Polymers get caught up in love-hate chemistry of oil and water

Researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee achieved a rare look at the inner workings of polymer self-assembly at an oil-water interface to advance materials for neuromorphic computing and ...

X-ray microscopy at BESSY II: Nanoparticles can change cells

Nanoparticles easily enter into cells. New insights about how they are distributed and what they do there are shown for the first time by high-resolution 3D microscopy images from BESSY II. For example, certain nanoparticles ...

Plant cells eat their own... membranes and oil droplets

Biochemists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory have discovered two ways that autophagy, or self-eating, controls the levels of oils in plant cells. The study, published in The Plant Cell on ...

Lipid droplets play crucial roles beyond fat storage

Lipid droplets: they were long thought of merely as the formless blobs of fat out of which spare tires and muffin tops were made. But these days, they're "a really hot area of research," says Michael Welte, professor and ...

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