Advance in 'optical tweezers' to boost biomedical research

Much like the Jedis in Star Wars use the Force to control objects from a distance, scientists can use light or optical force to move very small particles. The inventors of this ground-breaking laser technology, known as "optical ...

Team's bigger and better 'tweezer clock' is super stable

JILA physicists have boosted the signal power of their atomic "tweezer clock" and measured its performance in part for the first time, demonstrating high stability close to the best of the latest generation of atomic clocks.

Trapping nanoparticles with optical tweezers

By exploiting a particular property of light diffraction at the interface between a glass and a liquid, researchers have demonstrated the first optical tweezers capable of trapping nanoscale particles.

Engineers create micron-scale optical tweezers

In 2018, one-half of the Nobel Prize was awarded to Arthur Ashkin, the physicist who developed optical tweezers, the use of a tightly focused laser beam to isolate and move micron-scale objects (the size of red blood cells). ...

Trapping tiny particles: A versatile tool for nanomanipulation

At just 1/1000th of a millimeter, nanoparticles are impossible to see with the naked eye. But, despite being small, they're extremely important in many ways. If scientists want to take a close look at DNA, proteins, or viruses, ...

Why toothpaste and cement harden over time

Take a look inside the cap of your favorite toothpaste, and you might see hard, white residue, a firm version of the smooth paste you squeeze onto your brush.

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