Rats prefer to help their own kind—humans may be similarly wired

A decade after scientists discovered that lab rats will rescue a fellow rat in distress, but not a rat they consider an outsider, new UC Berkeley research pinpoints the brain regions that drive rats to prioritize their nearest ...

Study suggests rats smile with their ears

(Phys.org)—A team of researchers with the University of Bern in Switzerland has found that as part of feeling happiness, rats undergo a slight physical change. As the team notes in their paper uploaded to the peer-reviewed ...

Study on pesticides in lab rat feed causes a stir

French scientists published evidence Thursday of pesticide contamination of lab rat feed which they said discredited historic toxicity studies, though commentators questioned the analysis.

Rats found able to recognize pain in other rat faces

(Phys.org)—A team of researchers working in Japan with affiliations to several institutions in that country, has found that lab rats are able to recognize pain in the faces of other rats and avoid them when given the opportunity. ...

Ruthless boas know when to ditch their squeeze

Boa constrictors can sense the heartbeat of their quarry as they suffocate it, thus giving themselves the signal to know when the prey is dead, scientists say.

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