Krypton used to accurately date ancient Antarctic ice

A team of scientists has successfully identified the age of 120,000-year-old Antarctic ice using radiometric krypton dating – a new technique that may allow them to locate and date ice that is more than a million years ...

Krypton-81 isotope can help map underground waterways

Cataloguing underground waterways, some of which extend for thousands of miles, has always been difficult—but scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, with colleagues from the ...

Measuring the Speed of Noble 'Bubbles'

(PhysOrg.com) -- Using a layer of noble gas "bubbles," scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory devised a straightforward way to measure how fast molecules diffuse in supercooled liquids. Working at temperatures ...

How many argon atoms can fit on the surface of a carbon nanotube?

(PhysOrg.com) -- Phase transitions -- changes of matter from one state to another without altering its chemical makeup -- are an important part of life in our three-dimensional world. Water falls to the ground as snow, melts ...

Earth's atmosphere came from outer space, find scientists

(PhysOrg.com) -- The gases which formed the Earth's atmosphere - and probably its oceans - did not come from inside the Earth but from outer space, according to a study by University of Manchester and University of Houston ...

We owe it all to comets

Comets have always fascinated us. A mysterious appearance could symbolize God's displeasure or mean a sure failure in battle, at least for one side. Now Tel Aviv University justifies our fascination -- comets might have provided ...

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