Related topics: cancer cells

Resetting the biological clock by flipping a switch

The biological clock is present in almost all cells of an organism. As more and more evidence emerges that clocks in certain organs could be out of sync, there is a need to investigate and reset these clocks locally. Scientists ...

Piecing together the LanCL puzzle

Researchers from the Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology in collaboration with scientists at Oxford University have published a paper in Cell reporting the function of LanCL proteins. These proteins are found in eukaryotic ...

Big data kinase ohmics takes over drug discovery

In order for tumors to successfully take hold and spread in the body, they typically must meet several developmental milestones. These include things like suppressing apoptosis, cultivating replication and angiogenesis, weaning ...

Finding the Achilles' heel of a killer parasite

Two studies led by UT Southwestern researchers shed light on the biology and potential vulnerabilities of schistosomes—parasitic flatworms that cause the little-known tropical disease schistosomiasis. The findings, published ...

Enzyme prisons: Cell signaling with just one molecule

A team at the Max Dellbruck Center has answered a question that has puzzled scientists for some 40 years. In the journal Cell, the group explains how cells are able to switch on completely different signaling pathways using ...

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Kinase

In chemistry and biochemistry, a kinase is a type of enzyme that transfers phosphate groups from high-energy donor molecules, such as ATP, to specific substrates, a process referred to as phosphorylation. Kinases are part of the larger family of phosphotransferases. Kinases are not to be confused with phosphorylases, which carry out phosphorolysis, the breaking of a bond using an inorganic phosphate group; or with phosphatases, which remove phosphate groups.

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