Cormorants cannot capture the benefits of global warming

(Phys.org)—Even though cormorants seem ideally placed to benefit from global warming, by expanding their breeding range into the far north, the darkness of the polar night is likely to keep them firmly in their place, according ...

Endangered kangaroo prefers 'the girl next door'

(Phys.org)—A group of leading conservation scientists from The University of Queensland (UQ) and James Cook University (JCU) has exposed the private life of a small, endangered kangaroo.

How flick knife thumbs help Japan's rare fighting frogs

Combat-ready spikes which shoot from fingers sounds like the weaponry of a comic book hero, but a Japanese scientist has found exactly this in a rare breed of frog. The discovery, which is published in the Journal of Zoology, ...

Tasmanian tiger's jaw was too small to attack sheep, study shows

Australia's iconic thylacine, or Tasmanian tiger, was hunted to death in the early Twentieth century for allegedly killing sheep; however, a new study published in the Zoological Society of London's Journal of Zoology has ...

Study: Wild Cuban crocodiles hybridize with American crocs

A new genetic study by a team of Cuban and American researchers confirms that American crocodiles are hybridizing with wild populations of critically endangered Cuban crocodiles, which may cause a population decline of this ...

Getting a tail up on conservation?

Lizards are an important indicator species for understanding the condition of specific ecosystems. Their body weight is a crucial index for evaluating species health, but lizards are seldom weighed, perhaps due in part to ...

How do bumblebees get predators to buzz off?

Toxic or venomous animals, like bumblebees, are often brightly coloured to tell would-be predators to keep away. However scientists at Royal Holloway, University of London and Queen Mary, University of London have found a ...

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Journal of Zoology

The Journal of Zoology is a scientific journal concerning zoology, the study of animals. It was founded in 1830 by the Zoological Society of London and is published by Blackwell Publishing. It carries original research papers, which are targeted towards general readers. Some of the articles are available via open access, depending on the author's wishes.

From around 1833, it was known as the Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London ISSN 0370-2774. From 1965 to 1984, it was known as the Journal of zoology: proceedings of the Zoological Society of London, ISSN 0022-5460.

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