Related topics: plasma

Not all ions in tokamaks go with the flow

For the first time, scientists are measuring the rotation of the main (deuterium) plasma in the edge region of a fusion device. New spectroscopic measurements combined with state-of-the-art spectroscopic simulation made this ...

Chinese fusion tool pushes past 100 million degrees

The Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST), nicknamed the "Chinese artificial sun," achieved an electron temperature of over 100 million degrees in its core plasma during a four-month experiment this year. That's ...

Tokamak is ready to test ITER's internal components

On 14 December 2016, the WEST tokamak produced its first plasma, reflecting the success of the operations carried out since 2013 on the CEA nuclear fusion reactor. Now that this major milestone has been passed, preparation ...

Discrete convex analysis for analysis of iterative auctions

Researchers are investigating auction models where there are many different indivisible goods such as houses and cars. Notably, algorithms known as iterative auctions are often used to compute equilibrium prices of goods.

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ITER

Coordinates: 43°42′17.84″N 5°46′9.1″E / 43.7049556°N 5.769194°E / 43.7049556; 5.769194

ITER (originally an acronym of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) is an international nuclear fusion research and engineering project, which is currently building the world's largest and most advanced experimental tokamak nuclear fusion reactor at Cadarache in the south of France. The ITER project aims to make the long-awaited transition from experimental studies of plasma physics to full-scale electricity-producing fusion power plants. The project is funded and run by seven member entities - the European Union (EU), India, Japan, the People's Republic of China, Russia, South Korea and the United States. The EU, as host party for the ITER complex, is contributing 45% of the cost, with the other six parties contributing 9% each.

The ITER fusion reactor itself has been designed to produce 500 megawatts of output power for 50 megawatts of input power, or ten times the amount of energy put in. The machine is expected to demonstrate the principle of getting more energy out of the fusion process than is used to initiate it, something that has not been achieved with previous fusion reactors. Construction of the facility began in 2007, and the first plasma is expected in 2019. When ITER becomes operational, it will become the largest magnetic confinement plasma physics experiment in use, surpassing the Joint European Torus. The first commercial demonstration fusion power plant, named DEMO, is proposed to follow on from the ITER project to bring fusion energy to the commercial market.

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