Related topics: magnetic field · cancer cells · nanoparticles

Why black rhinos may get sick in captivity

Inflammation and oxidative stress may be involved in the pathogenesis of iron overload disorder in captive black rhinoceroses, making this syndrome a potential common denominator to various diseases described in captivity ...

Iron chemistry yields surprisingly effective catalyst

As every junkyard vehicle amply shows, iron is prone to rust into iron oxide. But this very reactivity also makes iron and its compounds useful tools for reinventing chemical transformations.

Unwinding the mystery of degraded reel-to-reel tapes

Crooner Bing Crosby knew a thing or two about sound. In 1947, recognizing that recorded music sounded better on magnetic reel-to-reel tape than on vinyl records, he invested in a company to develop equipment to record his ...

Protein discovered inside a meteorite

A team of researchers from Plex Corporation, Bruker Scientific LLC and Harvard University has found evidence of a protein inside of a meteorite. They have written a paper describing their findings and have uploaded it to ...

Scientists create new material for electronics of the future

Scientists at South Ural state University are creating a new material with predefined properties. It will be used in the production of microwave electronics, as well as in data transmission and protection against wave effects ...

Asteroid impact enriches certain elements in seawater

Asteroid strikes upset the environment and provide clues via the elements they leave behind. Now, University of Tsukuba researchers have linked elements that are enriched in the Cretaceous–Paleogene (KPg) boundary clays ...

Making simulated cosmic dust—in the microwave

Cosmic dust is the key to the chemical evolution of stars, planets, and life itself, but its composition is not well understood, and we can't currently collect samples for analysis. A few examples have arrived on Earth as ...

Rust offers a cheap way to filter arsenic-poisoned water

When water flows deep underground, it often dissolves inorganic substances from mineral deposits in the earth's crust. In many regions, these deposits contain arsenic, a naturally occurring element that is colorless, tasteless ...

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