Remains excavated of strategy board game from the Roman Iron Age

This April, researchers from the University Museum of Bergen excavated the remains of a small Early Iron Age grave cairn at Ytre Fosse, Western Norway. The location is spectacular, overlooking Alversund and the "Indre Skipsleia," ...

Levanluhta jewellery links Finland to a European exchange network

The Levänluhta water burial site, dating back to the Iron Age (300-800 CE), is one of Finland's most famous archaeological sites. Nearly one hundred individuals, mainly women or children, were buried in a lake located at ...

Prehistoric teeth give up their secrets

The isotope values of food consumed are reflected in the individual's tissues. As bone is constantly being turned over by remodelling, analysing the stable isotope ratios of bone collagen can shine a light on the main dietary ...

Broad genetic variation on the Pontic-Caspian Steppe

The genetic variation within the Scythian nomad group is so broad that it can only be explained by the group assimilating people it came in contact with. This is shown in a new study on Bronze and Iron Age genetics of the ...

How will humans adapt to climate change? Ask a Viking

Popular culture portrays Vikings as violent marauders who raided the coasts of Europe with impunity, but new research indicates the Vikings were vulnerable to at least one threat: a changing climate.

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